The Teacher’s Inner Scorecard

inner vs outer warren buffet teaching

Warren Buffet, the famous business magnate, investor, and philanthropist, asked a provocative question documented in Alice Schroeder’s biography of his life, Snowball:

LookitWould you rather be the world’s greatest lover, but have everyone think you’re the world’s worst lover? Or would you rather be the world’s worst lover but have everyone think you’re the world’s greatest lover? Now, that’s an interesting question. “Here’s another one. If the world couldn’t see your results, would you rather be thought of as the world’s greatest investor but in reality have the world’s worst record? Or be thought of as the world’s worst investor when you were actually the best?

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Perfectionism in Teachers

perfectionism in teachers and teaching

Frowning and stressed over a pile of student essays, Mary wrings her clenched hands and searches her desk drawers for another working red pen. Had all of them died already? Within only four hours of marking? “Oh, well,” Mary thinks to herself. “I’ll stop by the dollar store to get some on my way home from school.”

At 6:30 PM, she pushes the school doors open and says her goodbyes to the night custodian as she scrambles to her car, shoving the unmarked essays in the back seat—her hated companions for the night and the next morning.

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Beating Teacher Burnout III- Dealing with Disrespectful Students and Parents

disrespectful students advice for teachers

Teachers face disrespect; facing disrespect is tiring; disrespect causes some teachers to burnout and leave teaching. These are stories of real teachers and the disrespect they faced. Their names have been changed to protect their identities:

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Beat Burnout II- Ways for Teachers to Make More Money

How teachers can earn more money

When I began teaching years ago, I entered the profession with dear friends, people I knew to be the most resilient, kind, and ambitious. Within six years, half of these friends had left the teaching profession burnt-out, tired, and bitter.

Research across countries shows us that teacher attrition is generally higher than in many other professions, with attrition among teachers cited as affecting 30-40% of our profession.

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Beating Teacher Burnout—10 Tips for Work-Life Balance

teacher work life balance burnout

If you’re a frequent reader of the news, you will likely agree with me that the conversation about teaching in the last few years has been telling.

With headlines such as “Teacher Stress is Killing My Profession” (CBC), “Overwhelmed Canadian Teachers are Quitting in Droves” (The Epoch Times), and “Frustration. Burnout. Attrition. It’s Time to Address the National Teacher Shortage” (NPR) circulating the press, we know these are troubled times in teaching.

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Students Don’t Have to Hate Reading

When I was a little kid, I loved to read. And then I went to school.

When I was in middle and high school, unless it was required for class, I rarely picked up a book. I was just staying afloat with my teacher’s reading list. I didn’t particularly care for To Kill a Mockingbird or Ender’s Game, but damn it, I had to read them. I needed to read 30 minutes each day!  I had a project due on these books at the end of the month! If I didn’t do well on this book project, I might never get to university! I’d die on the streets, penniless, an unrecognized poet, wearing a ratty beret, smelling heavily of cheap merlot…

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Your Sanity- 4 Procedures to Protect It

classroom procedures for teachers

 

Nobody wants to become THAT teacher. The teacher that has given up on teaching, treating his or her classroom as a holding cell from 8 AM to 3PM, and a place for hungry and haggard inmates—teachers and students—to escape from at the first ring of the end-of-day bell.

Nobody wants to become THAT teacher. The teacher that photocopies his PowerPoints and throws these packages at students with the instructions: “Silent reading, then summarize.”

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Is Your Class Too Easy? (Lessons from Poland & Finland)

As a kid, I went to Poland every summer to visit my family.  My cousins and I would drink plum compote on my grandma’s porch, throw corn nibs at chickens, harvest potatoes in the field and then fry them into the best French fries we’ve ever tasted, jump into the local ice-cold creek and play harmonicas.

Interspersed between these country pleasures and mischief was talk of school. Our parents—although or perhaps because they had been born in a small village in poverty—valued education more than anything. And so, it was natural that my cousins and I would talk of what we were reading in school. These conversations went something like this:

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