Your Sanity- 4 Procedures to Protect It

classroom procedures for teachers

 

Nobody wants to become THAT teacher. The teacher that has given up on teaching, treating his or her classroom as a holding cell from 8 AM to 3PM, and a place for hungry and haggard inmates—teachers and students—to escape from at the first ring of the end-of-day bell.

Nobody wants to become THAT teacher. The teacher that photocopies his PowerPoints and throws these packages at students with the instructions: “Silent reading, then summarize.”

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Is Your Class Too Easy? (Lessons from Poland & Finland)

As a kid, I went to Poland every summer to visit my family.  My cousins and I would drink plum compote on my grandma’s porch, throw corn nibs at chickens, harvest potatoes in the field and then fry them into the best French fries we’ve ever tasted, jump into the local ice-cold creek and play harmonicas.

Interspersed between these country pleasures and mischief was talk of school. Our parents—although or perhaps because they had been born in a small village in poverty—valued education more than anything. And so, it was natural that my cousins and I would talk of what we were reading in school. These conversations went something like this:

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Let’s Talk: Professional Dress for Teachers

When I was in grade nine, I adored Mrs. Cohen. Something about the way she moved, with purpose, and how she dressed, with flair, made me want to be her. Although she was not a beauty, her pressed blouses, her beautiful jewelry, and her matching lipstick all oozed elegance. And in this respect Mrs. Cohen stood out. Of all the teachers I had as a student, she was the only one who dressed really beautifully. She was the only one to enter the classroom and announce, through the clothes she wore, “Pay attention! I am here! This is important!”

The pride Mrs. Cohen took in her appearance communicated to me that she cared about her job. Whether or not she took pride in being a teacher is uncertain, but it certainly made that impression on me. Even as a student, I intuitively knew that the way one dresses expresses not only how one feels about oneself, but also how one feels about one’s work.

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What Good (and Bad) Principals Teach Us About Teaching

Students complain about bad teachers.

Johnny comes home from school and complains his teacher plays favourites because his teacher praises only a few students and bashes the rest. Johnny hates when his teacher talks about him behind his back to other teachers and even students.

Maria complains to her parents over dinner that her teacher never has time for her and never answers questions.

Jason hates that his teacher is lazy—he sits and sips Starbucks and lectures behind his desk— while expecting only the best work from his students. “It’s hyporcritical!” Jason cries to his parents.  Another teacher takes days to reply to Jason’s emails and takes weeks to mark his work, yet expects Jason’s homework to be handed in on time. “It’s just not right!” moans Jason.

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5 Easy Vocabulary Games to Fill Extra Class Time (No prep)

It happens to every teacher.

Horror of horrors, you have finished your lesson and the practice and the students are getting antsy. The promise of cafeteria Jamaican patties and French fries make your students jittery.

With 10 minutes left in class, what is to be done?

On the rare occasion that your run out of things for students to do in class, you want to have something ready to throw at your students– something fun, educational, and no-prep.

All of these games are useful in almost any subject at the start of class to review yesterday’s lesson, at the end of class to check for understanding, or for test review.

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The Happy Teacher Habits by Michael Linsin (Summary & Review)

Happy teacher habits
You too can be a happy teacher.

Do you feel tired and exhausted during the school year and not sure what to do about it?

Do you wish your lessons were better, but you just don’t have the time for late-nights planning at home?

Do you wish you had time each work night to enjoy family dinner and the hobbies that, prior to teaching, were once part of your life?

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Would You Sign Up for Your Own Class?

Would you put an “X” for “yes” beside your own English class if you were a student with a course enrollment sheet in hand?

If you were a student today, would you choose to sign up to  your own class?

The answer to that question may well be the million-dollar question.

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5 Simple Ways to Raise Academic Expectations in Your Classroom

In a post earlier this month, I went over the research showing that a teacher’s high academic standards and expectations result in student success.

I always knew high standards work intuitively. My best teachers—the strict-as-nothing English, music, and karate teachers—all pushed me to new heights. They expected and demanded new heights, and I jumped up to deliver.

Now that I’m a teacher, I teach the same way.

Through observation and the reading of research, I’ve found the five secrets of high expectations teachers that any teacher can follow.

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Are You Tough Enough to Teach?

Everybody and his pet rabbit wants to become a teacher. Around this time of year, at least three students tell me they want to become teachers. Later in the year, I often discover, more future teachers pop out of the woodwork.

With eyes that seem to look towards a utopia, these students tell me they want to teach. They tell me they want to share their love of Shakespeare. Biochemistry. The finer points of geography. And they want to inspire. They want to, through their gentle lovingness, spark the latent fire of intelligence and humanity in teenagers obsessed with spinners and dabs.

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